Cross the Bridge

Living in the past, or uncertainty.

It’s not healthy to unpack our bags and stay.

Looking at pictures of bridges, it dawned on me how helpful they are. A bridge allows us to easily navigate over water, or treacherous ground.

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Photo by Satria Wira Bagaskara on Pexels.com

When I was a kid, the best part of the car ride was driving over a bridge. God wants us to be more childlike in our faith, and crossing a bridge takes faith. When did we become afraid of a bridge?

Melody Beattie writes, “Cross the bridge. You don’t have to understand it all right now. Information and understanding will come later. For now, trust and experience what you’re going through. Know that this time of change is sacred too.”

Pictures of bridges are beautiful. Driving across one offers a breathtaking view. Maybe it’s the journey itself, and not about ‘getting to the other side.’ The beauty is all around us while crossing the bridge.

 

Journey to the Heart

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Heart and Soul

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What Kind of Writer Are You?

I can tell what you read, by how you write.

I have read all of Melody Beattie’s books, and am now finishing up two books by Marianne Williamson. My writing has evolved over time, but this is where I sit. In a calm, quiet space. Allowing the words to fall to the page.

Maybe you have certain rules for writing.

Much like life itself, there aren’t many rules for me.

I’ve tried making a schedule like I do for work, but no joy there. Writing is a large part of who I am, so it comes from the heart. It’s a feeling I get, like I can feel the words welling up inside me. There is no schedule for that.

I’ve tried writing for other people, and that doesn’t work either. I cannot become something I’m not.

When we first moved to this little house near the city, I thought it would be fun to write for a local paper. Not a big one, just a small town vibe.  I called one and gained valuable insight. I spoke with the editor and told him I am a writer and would like to write about the town. I would share my stories with him, and he could place them in the community section of the paper.

He asked, “Are you a journalist, or someone who writes, and calls himself a writer?”

Come to find out, a journalist has to be news savvy. I haven’t watched the news in years and don’t read a paper. I was grateful for our conversation and happy to have spoken with him. He confirmed what I already knew. I’m a writer.

The only thing I need to know that would be newsworthy is, “When is Jesus coming back?” I’m pretty sure we will know.

So tell me, “What kind of writer are you?”

Living with Ambiguity

“Sometimes the picture isn’t finished yet.”

“Ideas, possibilities, hopes, dreams float around, circling us like asteroids around a planet. We may think events in our lives are happening aimlessly, without purpose. All we see are disconnected, floating blobs.”

“We reach for them, try to grab them in our hands so we can connect them, force them into a whole, force them into a picture we can see, something that makes sense.”

“Let the pieces be. Let yourself be. Let life be.”

“Sometimes, chaos needs to precede order. The pieces will come together in a picture that makes sense, in a beautiful work of art that pleases.”

“You don’t have to force the pieces to fit together if it’s not time. You don’t have to know. There is power in letting go.

“Power in waiting. Power in stillness. Power in trust. There is power in letting the disconnected pieces be until they settle into a whole. The action you are to take will appear.”

“Timely. Clearly. What you’re to do will become clear.”

(Excerpt from Melody Beattie~Journey to the Heart)

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A Good Problem

Blogging is like having a public journal.

Blogging has worked, because I kept misplacing journals whenever we moved. Writing publicly is healing, and can help others heal, so yes, it’s like letting everyone read your journal. I am behind, so let’s take some time to catch up.

I promised a friend I would write about this, so here it is E!

In August, I read a book by Melodie Beattie entitled, Make Miracles in Forty Days. You may be aware, I’m a huge Melody fan, and treasure all her books, but this one intrigued me. I believe in miracles, and believe I’m a walking miracle, so I read the book, and did what she said.

At first glance it seemed like another gratitude list exercise, but there’s a twist! You write what you’re grateful for, but you also write what you’re NOT grateful for.

On August 26th my writing began. At first it was habitual to list everything I was grateful for. Referring back to the book, I learned how to phrase things that were bothering me. Here are a few examples, along with their outcome.

You begin by writing, “I am grateful today that…”

My doctor wants to see me, even though I don’t know why. (The miracle is they were not alarmed by my mammogram and agreed to see me In Six Months)

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I have a dependable job, and get to work from home, even though I would like to make more money. (I was offered a new job)

I love my home, but would like for my daughter to live closer to town, her friends, and her father. (We are moving into a new home, near the lake, January 1st) I love the lake.

You get the idea. I’m grateful for a beautiful life, and this exercise helped open my heart, and mind for changes that needed to be made. The journaling continued longer than 40 days, because I still do it today. You can also do this with a friend via email. To just stay grateful, and let God work.

I told a friend, “I don’t know how many more of God’s blessings I can take!

That is a good problem to have.

Full of Stars

When my daughter was small, I imitated Martha Stewart.

She doesn’t remember much of the grand lifestyle, but the one thing she remembers, and misses, are the stars on the Christmas tree every year. I find it humourous this would be the one thing to stick with her. The stars were made of paper, and sold in a kit created by Martha Stewart.

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During my mammogram appointment, they asked me to lay on a table for the sonogram. I did so, and looked up to a view of paper flowers hanging from the ceiling. They were simply beautiful, and reminded me of these stars.

When I left my marriage, Christmas ornaments were not a priority, so the box of stars were left behind. There is no telling where they are today, but the great thing about a material object is… It can eventually be replaced.

A year ago, I searched, found and purchased a kit on Etsy.

It has been 20 years since making them, so I had to follow the instructions, and refresh my memory. It went smoothly until the part came where the paper stands up in fours points. I couldn’t get it to do it, and it was very frustrating.

God placed people in my life who taught me patience.

I’ve been sitting in the middle of my bed making stars.

My daughter will have a Christmas tree full of stars again.

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